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A place to search and comment on NCCOR-authored content and childhood obesity research and trends

Get research used: 6 tips for creating infographics for researchers

Infographics can be a powerful way to share your data and research. According to this Harvard Business Review article, “A great infographic is an instant revelation. It can compress time and space. … It can illuminate patterns in massive amounts of data.  It can make the abstract convincingly concrete.”

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NCCOR members explore metrics to express children’s energy expenditure

Physical activity plays an important role in the fight against childhood obesity. Developing, testing, and evaluating individual and environmental interventions and policies designed to increase youth physical activity would be enhanced if there were a comparable metric for physical activity applicable to youth. Several approaches have been used to express energy expenditure in youth, but no consensus exists as to which best normalizes data for the wide range of ages and body sizes across a range of physical activities.

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NCCOR Connect & Explore Webinar on relationship between childhood obesity declines, disparities

NCCOR’s Connect & Explore Webinar takes a closer look at childhood obesity declines, disparities, and opportunities to reconsider the design and impact of policies and interventions

While most of the United States continues to see increasing or steady childhood obesity rates, some areas are seeing modest though important declines. Yet these declines have not been uniform across all groups. The declines are often smaller among groups at the greatest risk, including black and Latino youth and those in low-income communities. The differences in declines among groups can lead to increased racial and ethnic disparities in these communities.

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Examining the cost-effectiveness of four childhood obesity interventions, researchers found that _____ and _____ were the most cost-effective.