NCCOR hosts May 19 seminar to explore ‘Bridging the Food Industry-Public Health Divide’

Please join us on Tuesday, May 19 at 12:30 pm for the seminar “Tackling the Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Conundrum: New Ways to Bridge the Food Industry-Public Health Divide.”

This seminar is the second in a five-part series on “Bridging the Food Industry-Public Health Divide: A Guide to More Effective Engagement and Policies.” Hank Cardello, Senior Fellow and Director of the Obesity Solutions Initiative at the Hudson Institute will host the seminar which will explore public health and industry perspectives around the facilitators, barriers, and strategies associated with tackling sugar-sweetened beverages.

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NCCOR hosts March 2 seminar to explore ‘Bridging the Food Industry-Public Health Divide’

Join the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation (HWCF), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and Hudson Institute for the first seminar in a quarterly series: “Articulating the Food Industry Context: Potential Frameworks for Profiting Health.” The first event, “Bridging the Food Industry-Public Health Divide: A Guide to More Effective Engagement and Policies,” will be led by Hank Cardello, Director of Hudson’s Obesity Solutions Initiative, and will be hosted by the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR). Cardello will be joined by panelists Wendy Johnson-Askew, Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Nestle and Richard Black, Vice President, Global Nutrition, PepsiCo.

The seminar will be held March 2, 1:30-3:30 p.m. at FHI 360, 1825 Connecticut Ave. NW, 8th Floor, Vista Room, Washington, DC. Continue reading

Most restaurant kids’ meals packed with calories

March 28, 2013, USA Today

By Nancy Hellmich

Most kids’ meals at top chain restaurants in the United States are still failing to make the grade when it comes to good nutrition, a new analysis finds.

Fried chicken fingers and nuggets, fries, and soda are the most common items offered to children, and some kids meals contain more than 1,000 calories and are high in sodium and fat, according to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). The government’s dietary guidelines recommend that children ages 4 to 10 eat 1,200 to 2,200 calories for the entire day.

“This is really disappointing,” says Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy for CSPI. “Restaurants should be doing better.” Continue reading