Gardening counts as moderate- to high-intensity exercise for kids, study finds

Feb. 4, 2014, Huffington Post

Gardening counts as moderate- to high-intensity exercise for kids, according to a small new study.

To gauge the physical intensity of common gardening activities, Korean researchers had 17 children with an average age of 12 in South Korea wear telemetric calorimeters and heart rate monitors as they engaged in 10 gardening-related activities, including watering, digging, sowing seeds, harvesting, and raking.

The children in the HortTechnology study were given five minutes for each task, with a five minute break between each task. They went to the gardens in two visits, and completed five tasks during each visit. Continue reading

Study: Preschoolers require 11 hours to achieve recommended daily physical activity

Jan. 9, 2013, News Medical

Preschool-aged children require the majority of their waking day, approximately 11 hours, to achieve their recommended daily physical activity, a Vanderbilt study published in Obesity found.

Children in the study, ages 3-5, achieved this activity through relatively short bursts of energy expenditure as opposed to the longer and more routine periods of exercise typically exhibited by adults.

Senior author Shari Barkin, M.D., director of the Division of General Pediatrics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt and William K. Warren Foundation Professor of Medicine, notes that several public health organizations offer general guidelines on how much moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) a preschooler needs, but there is very little data on how and if this activity is actually attained. Continue reading

How being heavy or lean shapes our view of exercise

Jan. 8, 2014, New York Times [Well Blog]

By Gretchen Reynolds

Overweight women’s brains respond differently to images of exercise than do the brains of leaner women, a sophisticated new neurological study finds, suggesting that our attitudes toward physical activity may be more influenced by our body size than has previously been understood.

For the study, which was published last month in the International Journal of Obesity, scientists affiliated with the Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality at Southwest University in Chongqing, China, recruited 13 healthy, young, normal-weight women and 13 who were overweight or obese.

The scientists asked their volunteers to complete two questionnaires, one of which probed the extent to which they considered exercise desirable; would they agree, for instance, that, “if I were to be healthy and active, it would help me make friends”? The other set of questions examined whether they expected exercise to be unpleasant; if they were to be physically active on most days, for example, would they expect to wind up feeling sore, or maybe even embarrassed by exercising in public? Continue reading

Study: Physical activity does not help burn abdominal fat in teens

Jan. 10, 2014, University Herald

By Stephen Adkins

It is a known fact that eating junk food causes bulging waistlines in adolescents. But a study by the UPV/EHU University of the Basque Country has found that abdominal fat cannot be reduced even if they engage in more physical activity.

Researchers said that the only way to fight obesity is through a combination of diet with lower fat content and lots of exercise.

“Until now it was thought even with an unbalanced diet, you somehow compensated for it if you got plenty of physical exercise,” researcher Dr. Idoia Labayen said in a press release. “Adolescents are a risk group as far as lifestyles are concerned because they are starting to take their own decisions about what they want and do not want to eat, and they are also going through a period in which many of them have stopped doing any sport.” Continue reading

Study: Strength training may boost kids’ activity

Nov. 4, 2013, Reuters

By Genevra Pittman

Whether children can and should participate in strength training has been a contentious issue. But new research suggests it is safe and may encourage young people to be more active in their everyday lives.

Researchers randomly assigned one group of children aged 10 to 14 to strength train twice a week and others to go to their typical gym classes.

After a few months, kids who did squats, crunches and bench presses were stronger than their classmates. And boys who did strength training had upped their weekly exercise by 10 percent.

“The initial idea was that training increases children’s motivation to be physically active,” said Dr. Udo Meinhardt. He led the study at the PEZZ Center for Pediatric Endocrinology in Zurich, Switzerland. Continue reading

Equipment, encouragement gets kids active during recess

Oct. 24, 2013, The Baltimore Sun

By Allison Bond

Providing children with sports equipment, encouragement, and a safe environment boosts their activity level during the school day, according to a recent study from Australia.

Researchers found that simple steps such as making sure elementary school students have bats and balls to use during recess or asking students to stand up between classes boosted physical activity during recess by as much as 40 percent.

“We all know that physical activity is important, especially with the growing obesity epidemic,” Dr. Vandana Madhavan, a pediatrician at Massachusetts General Hospital who was not involved in the research, told Reuters Health. “This study looks at multiple ways to increase activity in the school setting.” Continue reading

Exercise ‘boosts academic performance’ of teenagers

Oct. 22, 2013, BBC News

Intensive exercise improves the academic performance of teenagers, according to new research.

The study of about 5,000 children found links between exercise and exam success in English, math, and science.

It found an increase in performance for every extra 17 minutes boys exercised, and 12 minutes for girls.

The study by the universities of Strathclyde and Dundee in Scotland found physical activity particularly benefited girls’ performance at science.

The authors said this could be a chance finding or reflect gender differences in the impact of physical activity on the brain.

Children who carried out regular exercise, not only did better academically at age 11 but also at age 13 and in their exams at age 16, the study suggested. Continue reading

Preschooler physical activity influenced by several factors

Oct. 13, 2013, dailyRx

It’s important for all children to get a regular amount of physical activity each day. Sometimes, the amount they get is affected by factors at preschool.

A recent study identified nine factors that affected how much physical activity preschoolers got.

Boys were more active than girls, and rainy days decreased their activity levels.

The placement of the preschool on the playground and the time children spent at preschool in the afternoon also influenced their physical activity levels. Continue reading

New study explores ways to prevent unhealthy weight gain among rural school-aged children

Oct. 11, 2013, News Medical

In the United States, children don’t eat enough fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Instead, their diets typically include excessive amounts of sugars and solid fats, counter to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendations, increasing the risk of obesity and diabetes.

A team of investigators implemented a two-year intervention study in low-income, rural areas where a disproportionately higher risk of overweight and obesity habits among children persists, leading to increased risk of diabetes and heart disease in adulthood. The children enrolled in the study consumed significantly more fruits and vegetables. The results are published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

To evaluate students’ diet quality at the beginning and after the study, researchers designed the CHANGE (Creating Healthy, Active, and Nurturing Growing-up Environments) study, a two-year randomized, controlled, community- and school-based intervention to prevent unhealthy weight gain among rural school-aged children. Continue reading

Schools should not let liability concerns keep them from promoting physical activity

Kids spend many of their waking hours at school. This puts schools in a unique position to help promote physical activity and healthy habits among children. However, many schools are deterred by fears of increased risk of legal liability for personal injuries.

A new article in the American Journal of Public Health outlines three school-based strategies for promoting physical activity—Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs, joint use agreements, and playground enhancement— and describes how schools can substantially minimize their liability risk by engaging in an number of different approaches that include creating and maintaining safe facilities, having adequate insurance, and partnering with other organizations to share liability risk. In some cases schools are also protected under governmental immunity, further lowering their liability risk. Continue reading