Meet NCCOR researchers at the American Public Health Association’s 142nd Annual Meeting & Exposition

Researchers from the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) will be traveling to New Orleans for the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) 142nd Annual Meeting & Exposition, which takes place Nov. 15-19. More than 12,000 public health professionals from around the world participate in the annual meeting, sharing the latest research and information, promoting best practices, and advocating for public health issues. Continue reading

How family dynamics at the dinner table affect kids’ weight

Oct. 13, 2014, TIME

By Alice Park

“Eat together” is a mantra that doctors and nutritionists use regularly when they talk with families about eating healthy and maintaining normal weight. Children who eat regular family meals tend to have lower rates of obesity and eat more nutritiously. A new study published Oct. 13 in the journal Pediatrics takes a novel look at why. Continue reading

Building healthy communities: Establishing health and wellness metrics for use within the real estate industry

November 2014, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

It is increasingly well recognized that the design and operation of the communities in which people live, work, learn, and play significantly influence their health.

However, within the real estate industry, the health impacts of transportation, community development, and other construction projects, both positive and negative, continue to operate largely as economic externalities: unmeasured, unregulated, and for the most part unconsidered. This lack of transparency limits communities’ ability to efficiently advocate for real estate investment that best promotes their health and well-being. It also limits market incentives for innovation within the real estate industry by making it more difficult for developers that successfully target health behaviors and outcomes in their projects to differentiate themselves competitively. Continue reading

New video, infographics, and photos highlight deficiencies in the current U.S. food supply

The dietary recommendations for eating healthy have not changed much in the past few decades—eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and cut back on calories, sugar, and fat. However, it might not be possible for everyone to eat this way even if they tried.

A new study, published in the November issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, reveals that the food supply contains too much sodium, unhealthy fat, and added sugar and not enough fruits, vegetables, and whole grains for a balanced diet. The findings show that in order to achieve a healthy balance, the fruit supply would need to more than double and the supply of vegetables would need to increase by almost 50 percent. There would also have to be a 40 percent decrease in unhealthy fats and sugar, and more than a 50 percent decrease in sodium. Continue reading

Hungry or not, kids will eat treats

Oct. 21, 2014, Medical Xpress

Even though they are not hungry, children as young as age 3 find high-energy treats too tempting to refuse, according to new research from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT).

In a study of 3- and 4-year-olds, 100 percent of children opted for a sweet or savory snack despite eating a filling healthy lunch only 15 minutes prior. Continue reading

NCI releases new Dietary Assessment Primer

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) part of the National Institutes of Health, a funder of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR), is pleased to announce the availability of a web-based Dietary Assessment Primer. Various types of self-report instruments have been developed to assess dietary intake. Each has distinct features and strengths. The Dietary Assessment Primer: Continue reading

Johns Hopkins GOPC explores social networks

The Johns Hopkins Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC) hosted a symposium titled “The Social Network: a Systems Approach to #Childhood Obesity,” on Wednesday, Oct. 22. Guest speakers and leaders in the field guided the audience throughout the day, going from theory and principles to real-world applications. Continue reading

More physical activity improved school performance

Oct. 14, 2014, Medical Xpress

Just two hours of extra physical activity each week can improve school performance. This has been shown by a study of approximately 2,000 12-year-olds carried out by scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg [in Sweden].

Researchers Lina Bunketorp Käll, Michael Nilsson, and Thomas Linden at the Centre for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation at the Sahlgrenska Academy, tested the hypothesis that increased physical activity stimulates learning and improves school performance. Continue reading

Same genes linked to rapid infant growth, later weight gains

Oct. 21, 2014, HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

Infants who quickly add weight and length may be showing a genetic propensity for obesity as toddlers, a new study suggests.

In adults, certain genes have been linked to increased body fat, but the same genes in infants promote proportionate gains in fat and lean muscle, the researchers said. Continue reading

With extra weight, kids’ hearts change shape

Oct. 17, 2014, Reuters

By Kathryn Doyle

There are noticeable differences in the shape and function of hearts among obese and normal-weight adolescents, researchers say.

“We do not know if (these changes) are clinically meaningful or necessarily dangerous,” said Dr. Norman Mangner of the University of Leipzig Heart Center in Germany. “This is a cross-sectional study and, therefore, we cannot answer this question.” Continue reading