Study: Obesity’s link to type 2 diabetes not so clear-cut

Feb. 12, 2014, HealthDay

Although it’s a common belief that a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes often follows a large weight gain, a new study challenges that notion.

Researchers found that the majority of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes didn’t get the disease until they’d been overweight or obese for a number of years.

What’s more, participants who maintained stable levels of overweight and eventually developed type 2 diabetes didn’t have a significant rise in their level of insulin resistance — a traditional risk factor — before getting the disease.

“In general, the majority of individuals developing type 2 diabetes were rather weight stable during follow-up with a slightly higher average BMI [body mass index] than the diabetes-free population,” wrote study author Dorte Vistisen, at the Steno Diabetes Center in Denmark, and colleagues. Continue reading

Even mild weight loss may lower diabetes risk in obese teens

June 7, 2013, HealthDay

Obese teens do not need to lose large amounts of weight to lower their risk of developing diabetes, according to a new study.

Researchers found that obese teens who reduced their body mass index (BMI) by 8 percent or more had improvements in insulin sensitivity, a measure of how well the body processes insulin and an important risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. BMI is a measurement of body fat based on height and weight.

“This threshold effect that occurs at 8 percent suggests that obese adolescents don’t need to lose enormous amounts of weight to achieve improvements,” study co-author Dr. Lorraine Levitt Katz, a pediatric endocrinologist at the Diabetes Center for Children at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, said in a hospital news release.

“The improvements in insulin sensitivity occurred after four months of participating in a lifestyle-modification program,” Katz said. Continue reading

Type 2 diabetes progresses faster in kids, study finds

HealthDay, HealthDay

By Serena Gordon

Type 2 diabetes is more aggressive in children than adults, with signs of serious complications seen just a few years after diagnosis, new research finds.

“Based on the latest results, it seems like type 2 is progressing more rapidly in children,” said Dr. Jane Chiang, senior vice president of medical affairs and community information for the American Diabetes Association. “Complications are appearing faster, and it appears to be at a more significant rate than we see in adults.”

The results are alarming, Chiang and other experts said. “If these children continue to progress this rapidly, we could see many of the consequences of type 2 diabetes at a much younger age, like kidney disease and heart disease,” she said. Continue reading

One sugar-sweetened soda a day boosts diabetes risk

April 25, 2013, TIME

By Alexandra Sifferlin

All it takes is one can of soda to increase risk of type 2 diabetes by 22 percent, according to a new study.

In the study published in Diabetologia, researchers studied diet and drinking habits of about 28,500 people from Britain, Germany, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Sweden, France, Italy, and the Netherlands over a period of 15 years.

Those who consumed a 12-ounce serving of a sugared-beverage on average daily — about the size of a soda can — had a greater risk of developing diabetes compared to people who drank a can once a month or less. Continue reading