NCCOR members explore metrics to express children’s energy expenditure

Physical activity plays an important role in the fight against childhood obesity. Developing, testing, and evaluating individual and environmental interventions and policies designed to increase youth physical activity would be enhanced if there were a comparable metric for physical activity applicable to youth. Several approaches have been used to express energy expenditure in youth, but no consensus exists as to which best normalizes data for the wide range of ages and body sizes across a range of physical activities.

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NCCOR Connect & Explore Webinar on relationship between childhood obesity declines, disparities

NCCOR’s Connect & Explore Webinar takes a closer look at childhood obesity declines, disparities, and opportunities to reconsider the design and impact of policies and interventions

While most of the United States continues to see increasing or steady childhood obesity rates, some areas are seeing modest though important declines. Yet these declines have not been uniform across all groups. The declines are often smaller among groups at the greatest risk, including black and Latino youth and those in low-income communities. The differences in declines among groups can lead to increased racial and ethnic disparities in these communities.

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To find the solution to childhood obesity, NCCOR looks globally

Obesity is a global issue. High rates of childhood obesity around the world are prompting governments, organizations, and communities to take action in unprecedented ways. This includes developing and implementing policy measures, media campaigns, and community-wide diet-related and physical activity initiatives.

In October 2014, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) held a one-day forum—funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)—to convene leading international and interdisciplinary researchers and practitioners to share lessons learned from global efforts to reduce childhood obesity in the United States and worldwide. Using childhood obesity as a case study, forum participants considered emerging areas and cross-cutting goals to achieve RWJF’s mission of a Culture of Health.

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NCCOR to attend the 8th Biennial Childhood Obesity Conference

The National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) is excited to attend the 8th Biennial Childhood Obesity Conference in San Diego, Calif., held June 29-July 2, 2015. Workshops and plenaries at the conference will cover a wide range of topics including evaluation of population-based efforts, health and the built environment, healthy food marketing, and healthy food incentives.

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Raising the bar: How NCCOR supports researchers

In April 2015, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) held a presidential breakfast roundtable at the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s 36th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions. This excerpt from the roundtable presentation highlights how NCCOR is supporting researchers with tools to amplify their work and findings including the NCCOR Measures Registry, Catalogue of Surveillance Systems, and active list of funding opportunities and upcoming events.

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NCCOR, JPB Foundation form alliance to support Measures Registry

Through a two-year grant from The JPB Foundation, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) will strengthen its landmark Measures Registry by creating user guides for researchers. With more than 1,000 measures in the Measures Registry, the new guides will help users choose measures best suited for their research and evaluation work.

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Influence of school architecture and design on healthy eating: Key findings from systematic review

With up to 50 percent of students’ daily energy intake occurring in the school building, schools are often the focus of targeted efforts to combat childhood obesity. Recent evidence has shown that although school-based nutrition education programs may contribute to healthier eating habits, these programs are not consistently effective on their own.

In response, an exciting area of research is emerging with a focus on the physical design of school building features, such as cafeterias, teaching gardens, or access to drinking water, and the impact it can have on healthy eating behaviors and attitudes. As this body of research expands, however, little work has been done to quantify, categorize, and analyze it.

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Here are 3 reasons why researchers should use social media

Nearly 70 percent of obesity researchers reported using social media for professional purposes in 2014 compared to 42 percent in 2012, according to a 2014 survey conducted by the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR). The most common types of social media included LinkedIn (61 percent), Research Gate (51 percent), Facebook (28 percent), and Twitter (24 percent). Groups like the London School of Economics Public Policy Group encourage researchers to weave social media into dissemination efforts of their findings.

These are some of the reasons why researchers are using social media.

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Elevating the impact of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation

Public policy can play a major role in impacting childhood obesity, yet little is known about the role of nutrition and obesity policy research in informing public policy decisions.

A supplement published in the April issue of Preventing Chronic Disease includes an essay and three articles examining the role of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation. The supplement was organized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN).

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USDA center releases behavioral economics grant and fellowship opportunities

Up to five grants of $50,000 and six fellowships with $15,000 in seed grant funding were announced by Duke University and the University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research (BECR Center).

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