Speaker Bios

Anisa Baldwin Metzger
Tridib Banerjee
Nisha Botchwey
Adam Brumberg
Marjorie Cuthbert
Matthew Dalbey
Andrew L. Dannenberg
Steve Davis
Mary Filardo

Thomas Fisher
Rachel Gutter
Ross Hammond
Terry Huang
Nancy Huvendick
Caren S. Martin
James McClain
Noreen McDonald
Allison Nihiser

Sean O'Donnell
Kevin Patrick
Chris Pyke
Jack L. Robbins
Dina Sorensen
William Sullivan
Matthew Trowbridge
Sara Zimmerman


Anisa Baldwin Metzger

In 2008, Anisa Baldwin Metzger arrived in New Orleans with a computer, a phone and a broad assignment: keep the school district on track to rebuild LEED-certified schools and do what's necessary to support community-based greening efforts on the ground.

USGBC had created Anisa's support position in response to citizen action after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and she took it and ran with it. Her work has transformed public schools in New Orleans, resulting in at least 11 LEED-registered schools with four more nearing certification; eight LEED Green Associates and two LEED APs on school project management staff; an Indoor Air Quality Manager; a district recycling program; and a green school curriculum resource in circulation. Anisa has helped the schools change the perception of what public education can mean to the people of New Orleans.

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Tridib Banerjee

Tridib Banerjee, Ph.D., has focused his research, teaching, and writing on the design and planning of the built environment and the related human and social consequences. In particular, he is interested in the political economy of urban development, and the effects of globalization in the transformation of urban form and urbanism from a comparative international perspective. His current research includes implementation of smart growth policies, converting brown fields to affordable housing, designing for residential density and walkable communities, and transit oriented development. Professor Banerjee's previous areas of research and consulting have included comparative urbanism and urbanization, user perceptions of presidential environments, spatial environment of adolescence, urban scale vulnerability of seismic damages, privatization of public life and space, transit corridor design and developments, and regional growth visioning processes.

Banerjee has served as associate dean of the former USC School of Urban and Regional Planning from 1982 to 1986, and as vice dean of the USC School of Policy, Planning, and Development from 1998 to 2001. He is principal investigator of USC's Center for Economic Development and serves as the director of the Community Development and Design Forum. In addition to his work in the United States, his consulting, research, and teaching assignments have taken him to such countries as Bahrain, China, Ecuador, Egypt, Germany, India, Indonesia, Iran, Morocco, Mexico, Taiwan, Thailand, and the United Arab Emirates. His publications include Beyond the Neighborhood Unit (with William C. Baer), City Sense and City design: Writings and Projects of Kevin Lynch (co-edited with Michael Southworth), and Urban Design Downtown: Poetics and Politics of Form (with Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris). Professor Banerjee is a fellow of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP), a member of the Planning Accreditation Board (PAB), and is actively involved with the Association of the Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP).

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Nisha Botchwey

Nisha Botchwey is an Associate Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning and Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia. She specializes in community development with an emphasis on local religious and secular institutions, and public health promotion. Her multidisciplinary research is focused on community-based approaches to improving health by revitalizing unhealthy communities—places where the physical and social environments do not enable people to maximize their lives. Photovoice is her preferred methodology, and has been applied to projects spanning the globe from Central Virginia to rural South Africa, where communities envision and implement culturally and contextually sensitive recommendations that are developed collectively.

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Adam Brumberg

Adam Brumberg is the Deputy Director of the Cornell Food & Brand Lab and a Research Specialist in the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics & Management at Cornell University. Working directly with Brian Wansink andCornell Center for Behavioral Economics in Childhood Nutrition (BEN) co-director David Just, he coordinates academic and industry research conducted by both the Food and Brand Lab and the BEN Center.

Brumberg joined the Food & Brand Lab after a marketing/sales career in the wine industry during which he worked with all the links of the distribution chain as well as acting as a marketing/research consultant to a variety of industry and nonprofit clients. He is currently conducting research on how to adjust to an empty nest, now that he has two daughters in college.

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Marjorie Cuthbert

Dr. Cuthbert is currently the principal of Stoddert Elementary School, a District of Columbia Public School. She is in her ninth year as a principal in the DCPS system. She holds a Ph. D. in School Counseling and has also completed an additional educational leadership program. In addition to serving as an elementary principal, she has been the director of federal projects involving middle and high school transition programs for students with disabilities, a district-level administrator of Student Services, and a districtlevel Section 504 Coordinator. She has held multiple educational positions as a teacher, counselor, and administrator in several states, districts, and school systems; in each of these capacities, she has worked to bring all stakeholders together to create the best policies, implement procedures, and make shared decisions that benefit all students.

Dr. Cuthbert is very proud to serve as the principal of Stoddert, as it is a green school inside and out. A group of students named the "Green Team" serve as guides to others to show the energy-saving features of the building and grounds, from the fields that cover the 72 geothermal wells to the composition of the materials in the floor. Information about energy usage and construction is readily available on a green touchscreen in the lobby, presented in four different languages. A wonder garden created and maintained by the school and community groups sits above the amphitheatre that leads to green fields which are shared by DCPS and the Department of Parks and Recreation. Dr. Cuthbert invites all to experience the environmental amenities at Stoddert that enhance the students and contribute to continued high achievement and expected excellence. Her belief that every child can learn and demonstrate growth from his or her own baseline drives her work, where she collaborates with colleagues, teachers, and students to study issues, track trends, and implement best practices.

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Matthew Dalbey

Matt Dalbey is a senior policy analyst with the U.S. EPA's Development, Community and Environment Division. Prior to joining EPA, Dalbey spent five years on the faculty at Jackson State University in Jackson, MS where he taught in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Dalbey is a graduate of the College of William & Mary (BA), the University of Virginia (MCP) and Columbia University (PhD)."

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Andrew L. Dannenberg

Andrew L. Dannenberg MD, MPH, is a consultant to and formerly Team Lead of the Healthy Community Design Initiative in the National Center for Environmental Health, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. For the past decade, his research and teaching has focused on examining the health aspects of community design including land use, transportation, urban planning, and other issues related to the built environment. He has a particular interest in the use of a health impact assessment as a tool to inform community planners about the health consequences of their decisions.

Dr. Dannenberg also holds faculty appointments as an Affiliate Professor in environmental health and in urban design and planning at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he teaches interdisciplinary courses on health impact assessment and on healthy community design. Previously he served as Director of CDC's Division of Applied Public Health Training, as Preventive Medicine Residency director and as an injury prevention epidemiologist on the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health in Baltimore, and as a cardiovascular epidemiologist at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Dr. Dannenberg is the lead author with Howard Frumkin and Richard Jackson of the new book Making Healthy Places: Designing and Building for Health, Well-Being, and Sustainability, published in August 2011 by Island Press (www.makinghealthyplaces.org).

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Steve Davis

Steve Davis is the Director of Sustainable Design at VMDO Architects. In the past he has served as a Project Manager for UVA's John Paul Jones Arena, and has worked on projects such as the Charlottesville Transit System Operations Center, and the Wintergreen Resort's Associate Housing. Davis has a Master of Architecture from Harvard University, and a MS in Architecture from the University of Virginia.

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Mary Filardo

Mary Filardo founded the 21st Century School Fund (21CSF) in 1994 to provide the District of Columbia and other urban communities with leadership, innovative financing solutions, research, and public policy analysis of public and recently charter school facility issues. In 2002, 21CSF initiated Building Educational Success Together (BEST), a national collaborative of urban education equity and reform organizations dedicated to improving urban school facilities. Mary is a leading national authority on school facility planning, including local school, parental and community involvement in facilities, efficient management and capital financing. She has written extensively on these public school facility issues, and developed pilot software to support long-range facilities master planning. Mary received a BA in philosophy and mathematics from St. John's College, and a MA in Public Policy and Finance at the University of Maryland.

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Thomas Fisher

Thomas Fisher is a Professor and Dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota. Educated at Cornell University in architecture and Case Western Reserve University in intellectual history, he previously served as the Regional Preservation Officer at the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland. Mr. Fisher has also served as the Historical Architect of the Connecticut State Historical Commission, and the Editorial Director of Progressive Architecture magazine. He has lectured or juried at over 40 schools and 60 professional societies, and has published 35 book chapters or introductions and over 250 articles. Mr. Fisher has written six books— In the Scheme of Things, Alternative Thinking on the Practice of Architecture; Salmela Architect; Lake/Flato Buildings and Landscapes; Architectural Design and Ethics: Tools for Survival; Ethics for Architects; and The Invisible Element of Place, The Architecture of David Salmela.

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Rachel Gutter

Rachel Gutter is currently serving as the inaugural Director of the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Ms. Gutter came to USGBC in 2007 to oversee the launch of LEED for Schools, a version of USGBC's popular green building certification program that facilitates the design, construction and operations of high-performance, green schools. To accelerate market transformation, USGBC launched the National Green Schools Campaign to engage students and teachers, parents and school superintendents, elected officials and other policy makers in a national conversation about the relationship between highperformance educational facilities and high performing students.

Ms. Gutter's professional experiences in the fields of green building consulting and interior architecture and her time with the Green Building Program of Montgomery County Public Schools have contributed to her in depth knowledge of green schools. However, it is her six years of teaching experience that fuels her commitment to educating a generation of sustainability natives. Ms. Gutter received her Bachelor of Arts from Tufts University. A competitive figure skater throughout her childhood, today she finds balance through a daily dose of yoga.

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Ross Hammond

Ross A. Hammond is Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at The Brookings Institution, where he is Director of the Center on Social Dynamics and Policy. His primary area of expertise is modeling complex social dynamics in economic, political, and public health systems using mathematical and agent-based computational methods. His current research topics include: obesity, behavioral epidemiology, corruption, ethnocentrism and inter-group relations, segregation, the dynamics of trust, and ecosystem dynamics. Hammond received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. He has authored or co-authored numerous articles in journals such as Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Evolution, Preventing Chronic Disease, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

Hammond's work has been featured in New Scientist, Salon, and The Atlantic Monthly, and covered by NPR, the BBC, the Associated Press, and major news outlets. Hammond currently serves on the editorial board of the journal Childhood Obesity and on the steering committee for the Comparative Modeling Network of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. He is also an invited member of the recently formed NIH Network on Inequality, Complexity, and Health (NICH). Hammond has previously been the Okun-Model Fellow in Economics at the Brookings Institution, an NSF Fellow in the Center for the Study of Complex Systems at the University of Michigan, a visiting scholar at The Santa Fe Institute, and a Consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.

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Terry Huang

Terry Huang is Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Promotion at the College of Public Health at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Senior Advisor for the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research which coordinates activities across the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Agriculture, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Prior to returning to academia, Terry was Director of the Obesity Research Strategic Core at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development where he played a leading role in developing new national research directions and funding priorities. Terry is currently one of the leading proponents on the integration of systems science and chronic disease prevention. He leads a national and global agenda on systems science education and research in public health, with a particular focus on pediatric obesity, multilevel prevention strategies, and the translation of science to policy. Terry holds a Ph.D. in Preventive Medicine, a Master's of Public Health Degree in Epidemiology and Biostatistics from the University of Southern California and a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology from McGill University.

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Nancy Huvendick

Nancy Huvendick, D.C. Program Director, was a longtime parent advocate for improved education both at her local schools and across the District before coming to the 21st Century School Fund in 2001. Nancy consistently provides technical assistance to school communities in the District of Columbia in school facility space planning, school consolidation, schoolyard greening, capital budgeting and project management. She is often consulted for her broad knowledge of D.C. schools, neighborhoods and community concerns. She has a BA in art education from Johnson State College (Vermont) and an MA in art history from the George Washington University.

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Caren S. Martin

Caren S. Martin, PhD, CID, FASID, is an associate professor of interior design in the Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel in the College of Design at the University of Minnesota. She teaches upper level undergraduate design studios and a cross-disciplinary graduate course, DES 5168 – Evidence- Based Design, which she created in 2009. A principal investigator on numerous funded projects at the university, her scholarship addresses opportunities and challenges related to the professionalization of design. Martin is co-creator and Executive Director of InformeDesign®, an evidence-based design tool (www.informedesign.org) that has provided design and human behavior research in the form of evidence-based design criteria to designers of the built environment worldwide since 2003. She has nearly 20 years of institutional, corporate, and healthcare interior design/ project management experience gained in multidisciplinary firms headquartered in the Minneapolis/ St. Paul area.

Martin was a two-term governor appointee on Minnesota's professional licensing board (Architecture, Engineering, Land Surveying, Landscape Architecture, Geoscience, and Interior Design, 2000-2008). She has co-authored three studies that define and document the interior design profession's body of knowledge (2001, 2005, 2010) and has coedited The State of the Interior Design Profession (Fairchild Books, 2010), which is a compilation of 76 essays that discuss the value of design, perceived identity, and regulation of practice— among other topics, authored by practitioners and educators across the United States and Canada. Martin was inducted into the American Society of Interior Designers College of Fellows (ASID, 2009), and has received Presidential Citations from both ASID (2003, 2008) and the Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC, 2008). In 2010 she received the Education Leadership Award from the Association of Registered Interior Designers of Ontario (ARIDO). In 2011, she was appointed by IDEC to the National Academy of Environmental Design (NAED) to serve as that organization's representative.

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James McClain

James McClain, PhD, MPH, is a Physical Activity Epidemiologist with the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch in the Applied Research Program. He first joined National Cancer Institute as a Cancer Prevention Fellow in 2007. James earned a BS and MS in Exercise Physiology from Iowa State University; a PhD in Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Wellness from Arizona State University; and an MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research has focused on objective technologies and methods for assessment of physical activity among children and adults.

McClain's current projects include development of methods and applications for physical activity surveillance and behavioral interventions utilizing distributed wireless technologies and body sensor networks. James is focused on exposure assessment in physical activity as a tool to link acute and chronic characteristics of objectively motion profiles to mechanisms of chronic disease prevention. His current interests focus on advanced body area networks and biological sensors for assessment of health behaviors in clinical or intervention settings, and applications of these technologies for outcomes reporting to patients, electronic medical records, and health research.

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Noreen McDonald

Noreen McDonald is a faculty member in the city and regional planning department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My work focuses on travel behavior and addresses cross-cutting policy questions in the fields of planning, education, and public health around increasing children's physical activity and the siting of schools.

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Allison Nihiser

Allison Nihiser is a health scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Allison synthesizes research around school-based physical activity and nutrition to produce strategies and guidelines for schools. Much of her work focuses on school-based BMI measurement programs, physical activity, fitness testing, and providing technical assistance to grantees and partners on obesity prevention policies and practices in schools. Allison received two bachelor degrees from Miami University in Ohio in Exercise Science and Zoology. Allison obtained a Master's Degree in Public Health from Yale University, where she focused on Chronic Disease Epidemiology.

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Sean O'Donnell

Sean O'Donnell has over 18 years' experience in the architecture field focused on the design of great learning environments. On projects ranging from the development of a program, the evaluation of an existing building, to the design of new campuses, he has worked to ensure that the learning environment is fully supportive of all of the users' physical, intellectual, social/ emotional, organizational and technological needs. This work is a logical outgrowth of his research into the ability of environments to successfully accommodate diverse and changing user needs over time – research that was published in an award-winning monograph.

Sean is a recognized leader in educational facility planning and design. He founded and serves as the chair of the AIA/DC Committee on Architecture for Education and has served as a juror for the National School Board Association's "Learning by Design" awards; the Virginia School Board Association Design Awards, the Council of Educational Facilities Planners, International's National School Building Week and the Richard Riley Award. He has participated in forums with educators from across the nation organized by "Great Schools by Design," is a member of the Advisory Committee for the Helping Johnny Walk to School initiative for the National Trust for Historic Preservation; and has written and been interviewed for articles including "An Elementary School With a Global Focus: The Building as a Teaching Tool," CEFPI Journal, "Schoolhouse of the Future," Learning by Design, "The 21st Century School" Contract Magazine, "Building the Perfect School" American School Board Journal and "Place-Making" Learning by Design.

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Kevin Patrick

Kevin Patrick MD, MS is Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, and Director of the Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems (http://cwphs.ucsd. edu) at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), San Diego Division. He is a Senior Advisor to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Active Living Research Program and served on the Secretary's Council for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and as a member of the Armed Forces Epidemiology Board. He has been a PI or Co-PI on more than $40 million in research and training grants funded by NIH, NSF, CDC, HRSA and others. His research explores how to use mobile and social technologies to measure and improve health-related behaviors. He is co-founder of Santech, Inc., a company based in San Diego, California focusing on evidencebased mobile & social behavior change technologies.

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Chris Pyke

Chris Pyke, Ph.D. is the Vice President of Research for the US Green Building Council. He directs a diverse research portfolio focused on applications of advanced information systems and analytics. His recent work includes directing the development of the Green Building Information Gateway – an innovative information platform for multi-criteria comparison and benchmarking of green building projects. Dr. Pyke serves in a number of advisory roles related to energy, climate change, and natural resource management, including lead author for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report Working Group III, and Chair of the US EPA Chesapeake Bay Program Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee. He is a Fellow with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science Center for Coastal Resources Management.

Prior to joining USGBC, Dr. Pyke served as a research scientist with the US EPA's Office of Research and Development and a postdoctoral fellow in residence at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. While with US EPA, Dr. Pyke was the co-chair of the Climate Change Science Program Interagency Working Group on Human Contributions and Responses to Climate Change. Dr. Pyke is the author over 50 technical publications in journals including Climatic Change, Environmental Science & Policy, Sustainable Development Law & Policy, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Ecosystems, Ecology and Society, Conservation Biology, Ecological Modeling, Biological Conservation, and Wetlands. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of California Santa Barbara and a B.S. from the College of William and Mary.

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Jack L. Robbins

Jack Robbins is an architect and senior urban designer with Perkins+Will, based in their New York office. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his architecture degree at Yale, where was a founding participant in the Yale Urban Design Workshop. He began his professional career in Hong Kong where worked on projects around Southeast Asia, and organized Hong Kong's first public planning charrette. He returned to New York to work for Robert A.M. Stern, where he led teams on projects including the Comcast Tower in Philadelphia, the residential highrise 15 Central Park West in New York, and the Master Plan for the redevelopment of the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Jack ran the New York office of the San Franciscobased firm SMWM before that firm became part of Perkins+Will. Recently, he completed the reuse plan for the Walter Reed Army Medical Center for the Washington DC government. He is currently leading a project to help the city of Providence, Rhode Island, develop a new "Knowledge District" focused on biomedical research in the Jewelry District and Rhode Island Hospital areas of that city.

Jack's writing has appeared in Architectural Record, World Architecture, and The New York Times. His article in Fast Company's Co.Design on Active Design last February received much attention and was picked up by a wide range of blogs, newsletters, and websites in both the design and public health fields. He has become an advocate for Active Design serving on an Active Design panel at an American Planning Association conference and as a judge for the Active Design competition hosted by the Urban Green Council of New York. In June he delivered a lecture at the National Building Museum on an Active Design as part of an EPAsponsored series on Smart Growth. He authored a forthcoming article on active design and obesity that will appear this November in Columns magazine.

He brings to all his work a passionate belief in the power of creative, rigorous, design to solve complex urban problems and transform cities everywhere.

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Dina Sorensen

Dina Sorensen is a Designer with VMDO Architects.

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William Sullivan

William Sullivan is Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Illinois. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan with a concentration in Environment and Behavior. His research examines the health benefits that landscapes convey. Sullivan is President of the Council of Environmental Deans and Directors and a member of the National Academies' Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Environment and Health. He teaches courses on Environmental Sustainability, the Built Environment and Human Health, and Human Factors in Design.

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Matthew Trowbridge

Matthew Trowbridge is a physician and public health researcher in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and a senior advisor to the National Cancer Institute within the National Institutes for Health. Dr. Trowbridge's academic research focuses on the role of architecture, urban design, and transportation planning in physical activity promotion, traffic injury prevention (including pedestrian safety), and prehospital emergency care including EMS systems. Dr. Trowbridge obtained both his medical and public health training at Emory University and completed an injury research fellowship at the University of Michigan. Currently, Dr. Trowbridge serves as chair of the Built Environment & Transportation planning subcommittee for the 2012 Centers for Disease Control Weight of the Nation Conference and is a member of the advisory board for the National Policy & Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN) on issues related to their 'Active Built Environment' focus area.

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Sara Zimmerman

Sara Zimmerman is a senior staff attorney at Public Health Law and Policy (PHLP), working on the National Policy & Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN). Sara works on legal issues related to healthy land use and transportation policy, including topics such as safe routes to school, complete streets, and active design. Sara has written various articles and is a contributor to a forthcoming book on pedestrian friendly design, as well as to the American Planning Association's Complete Streets: Best Policy and Implementation Practices, a Planning Advisory Service Report. Prior to joining PHLP, she worked at the Community Benefits Law Center at Partnership for Working Families and at Disability Rights Advocates, in addition to other nonprofit organizations. She also clerked for Judge Richard Paez of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. She is a graduate of Swarthmore College (Phi Beta Kappa) and the UC Berkeley School of Law (Order of the Coif).

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