Connect & Explore: Evaluating Health Care-Community Collaborations: Implications and Recommendations for the Field

The health care sector is working toward engaging communities to directly address population health, including childhood obesity prevention. Exploring the integration of clinic-community programs and evaluating these initiatives is vital for moving childhood obesity prevention efforts forward.

On November 10, NCCOR is hosting part three of a three-part Connect & Explore webinar series on Evaluating Health Care-Community Collaborations. The webinar will feature groundbreaking research examining hospitals’ community benefit activities to improve healthy food access, reduce risk of obesity and diet-related disease, and promote healthier food systems in their communities.

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Journal of Physical Activity and Health Publishes Special Issue on Youth Energy Expenditure

Since 2012, NCCOR has sponsored a Youth Energy Expenditure (YEE) workgroup to support research efforts to achieve consensus on methods and measures for establishing youth energy expenditure values. This is important for efforts to reduce childhood obesity because standardized measures to quantify the amount of energy children expend during physical activity have been lacking. These measures are vital for comparing the effects of physical activity interventions and for cost and benefit research.

Until recently, researchers studying children and adolescents have relied on the Adult Compendium of Physical Activities to translate the energy cost of various physical activities into standardized values. However, the energy costs of physical activity change as children grow and mature, making adult values inappropriate for youth.

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NCCOR Childhood Obesity Declines – New RWJF Signs of Progress Data

In 2013, NCCOR formed the Childhood Obesity Declines Workgroup, to better understand reported declines in childhood obesity. An expert panel convened to start assessing how U.S. cities and counties are developing and operationalizing obesity reduction interventions, initiatives, and strategies. Four communities were identified to be studied: New York City (NY), Philadelphia (PA), Granville County (NC), Anchorage (AK) in order to examine the reasons behind the change in obesity rates and exploring, more generally, how communities can address childhood obesity. The Site Summary Reports for the NCCOR sites can be accessed on the Childhood Obesity Declines Project Page.

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USDA releases new guide for SNAP-Ed evaluation

Since 2012, NCCOR has worked with USDA to promote evidence-based and actionable tools consistent with the context and policies of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

SNAP-Education (SNAP-Ed), the nutrition education and obesity prevention arm of the SNAP, aims to increase the likelihood that SNAP-Ed eligible households will make healthy diet and physical activity choices within a limited budget. SNAP-Ed is central to USDA efforts to improve nutrition and prevent or reduce diet-related disease and obesity among SNAP recipients. As a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, changes in policies, systems, and environments (PSEs) were to be layered with direct nutrition education and marketing to enable, promote, and support healthy behaviors among low-income people and their communities.

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IPEN study reports that daily physical activity is related to where we live

Is the amount of physical activity we achieve each day related to where we live? A new research study published in The Lancet provides evidence that the answer is yes. The study from the International Physical Activity and Environment Network (IPEN), which included 6822 adults aged 18–66 from 14 cities in 10 countries found that individuals who live in the most activity friendly neighborhoods achieved as much as 90 more minutes of physical activity each week compared to those individuals living in the least activity friendly neighborhoods.

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USDA releases updated SNAP-Ed Toolkit

The third edition of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) Toolkit includes more than 80 interventions and 20 resources categorized by target behavior, intervention or resource type, and setting.

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Call for Proposals on the Economics of Food Security, Nutrition, and Health

How do nutrition assistance programs, the location of stores and the types of food they sell, and other aspects of the built environment affect diet, nutrition, and food security? A new 2-year research initiative by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) will investigate these questions.

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To find the solution to childhood obesity, NCCOR looks globally

Obesity is a global issue. High rates of childhood obesity around the world are prompting governments, organizations, and communities to take action in unprecedented ways. This includes developing and implementing policy measures, media campaigns, and community-wide diet-related and physical activity initiatives.

In October 2014, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) held a one-day forum—funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)—to convene leading international and interdisciplinary researchers and practitioners to share lessons learned from global efforts to reduce childhood obesity in the United States and worldwide. Using childhood obesity as a case study, forum participants considered emerging areas and cross-cutting goals to achieve RWJF’s mission of a Culture of Health.

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NCCOR, JPB Foundation form alliance to support Measures Registry

Through a two-year grant from The JPB Foundation, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) will strengthen its landmark Measures Registry by creating user guides for researchers. With more than 1,000 measures in the Measures Registry, the new guides will help users choose measures best suited for their research and evaluation work.

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Revised food labels still won’t tell whole story

Oct. 26, 2014, The New York Times [Well Blog]

By Jane E. Brody

Are you among the half of Americans who say they check the nutrition labels on packaged foods when shopping? If you can read the information without a magnifying glass, do you understand what the many numbers mean to your health?

Do you look only at calories, or do you also check the amounts of sugar, sodium, protein, or dietary fiber in a serving? And does the serving size listed represent how much you might actually consume at a sitting? Continue reading