Hungry or not, kids will eat treats

Oct. 21, 2014, Medical Xpress

Even though they are not hungry, children as young as age 3 find high-energy treats too tempting to refuse, according to new research from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT).

In a study of 3- and 4-year-olds, 100 percent of children opted for a sweet or savory snack despite eating a filling healthy lunch only 15 minutes prior. Continue reading

Same genes linked to rapid infant growth, later weight gains

Oct. 21, 2014, HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

Infants who quickly add weight and length may be showing a genetic propensity for obesity as toddlers, a new study suggests.

In adults, certain genes have been linked to increased body fat, but the same genes in infants promote proportionate gains in fat and lean muscle, the researchers said. Continue reading

Smoking, extra weight in pregnancy tied to obesity throughout childhood

June 23, 2014, Reuters

By Shereen Lehman

Women who smoke during pregnancy and are overweight early in pregnancy are more likely to have children who become obese as toddlers and stay obese through their teenage years, according to a new study.

Obesity rates have more than doubled among U.S. children and quadrupled among U.S. adolescents in the past three decades, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in every three young people is obese.

The authors of the new study looked at how children’s body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight in relation to height, changed over time, from ages 1 to 18. They found being consistently obese was associated with certain exposures in the womb, and with having asthma and other problems in adolescence.

Past studies looking at risk factors for obesity and the consequences of being obese have focused on weight at one point in time, Dr. Wilfried Karmaus said. Continue reading

Toddlers who sleep less may eat more

March 25, 2014, HealthDay

Toddlers who get too little sleep tend to eat more and are at increased risk for obesity, a new study indicates.

The study included children in over 1,300 British families who had their sleep measured when they were 16 months old and their diet checked when they were 21 months old.

Those who slept less than 10 hours a day consumed about 10 percent more calories than those who slept more than 13 hours, according to the study in the International Journal of Obesity.

This is the first study to link amount of sleep to calorie consumption in children younger than 3 years, the University College London (UCL) researchers said. They suggested that shorter sleep may disrupt the regulation of appetite hormones. Continue reading

Pre-packaged foods too salty for young children

March 22, 2013, Red Orbit

By Brett Smith

On average, Americans like their food salty, but it is an affinity that often results in conditions like hypertension and heart disease.

A new study from officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that many pre-packaged children’s food may be giving the youngest Americans an early start when it comes to eating salty foods. They may also be giving these young kids an early start on lifelong health issues as a result of too much sodium in their diet. Continue reading