More salt in kids’ diets may mean more obesity

Dec. 10, 2012, WebMD

By Rita Rubin

Limiting children’s salt intake could be one way to reduce childhood obesity, new research suggests.

The study of more than 4,200 Australian children aged 2 to 16 years old found that those who ate more salt also drank more fluids, particularly sugar-sweetened beverages — namely soda, fruit drinks, flavored mineral waters, and sports and energy drinks. Continue reading

Soda, other sugary drinks more firmly tied to obesity in new studies

Sept. 21, 2012, Huffington Post

By Marilynn Marchione

New research powerfully strengthens the case against soda and other sugary drinks as culprits in the obesity epidemic.

A huge, decades-long study involving more than 33,000 Americans has yielded the first clear proof that drinking sugary beverages interacts with genes that affect weight, amplifying a person’s risk of obesity beyond what it would be from heredity alone. Continue reading