Six ways to celebrate National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

Rates of childhood obesity are finally beginning to slow, or even decline, in some communities, and this positive development lends urgency and momentum to childhood obesity research efforts.

In recognition of the start of National Childhood Obesity Awareness month on Sept. 1, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) is calling on partners, public health and health care professionals, and others engaged with the movement to show their support for childhood obesity research.

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Raising the bar: How NCCOR supports researchers

In April 2015, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) held a presidential breakfast roundtable at the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s 36th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions. This excerpt from the roundtable presentation highlights how NCCOR is supporting researchers with tools to amplify their work and findings including the NCCOR Measures Registry, Catalogue of Surveillance Systems, and active list of funding opportunities and upcoming events.

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NCCOR, JPB Foundation form alliance to support Measures Registry

Through a two-year grant from The JPB Foundation, the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) will strengthen its landmark Measures Registry by creating user guides for researchers. With more than 1,000 measures in the Measures Registry, the new guides will help users choose measures best suited for their research and evaluation work.

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Influence of school architecture and design on healthy eating: Key findings from systematic review

With up to 50 percent of students’ daily energy intake occurring in the school building, schools are often the focus of targeted efforts to combat childhood obesity. Recent evidence has shown that although school-based nutrition education programs may contribute to healthier eating habits, these programs are not consistently effective on their own.

In response, an exciting area of research is emerging with a focus on the physical design of school building features, such as cafeterias, teaching gardens, or access to drinking water, and the impact it can have on healthy eating behaviors and attitudes. As this body of research expands, however, little work has been done to quantify, categorize, and analyze it.

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NCCOR’s 2014 Annual Report highlights new frontiers in childhood obesity

In 2014, NCCOR made strides in exploring new frontiers in childhood obesity. NCCOR’s recently released Annual Report 2014 explores three emerging and important childhood obesity research topics at the center of these efforts: healthy food incentives; lessons learned from global efforts; and childhood obesity declines.

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Registration now open for Active Living Research’s Annual Conference

Registration is now open for the Active Living Research (ALR) 2015 Annual Conference. The theme of the 2015 conference, “The Science of Policy Implementation,” explores the process of taking findings from the research field of active living and using them to inform policies that increase population-level physical activity. The conference will be held Feb. 22-25, 2015 in San Diego. Continue reading

CDC report shows progress in school health practices

By Allie Bidwell

Over the last several years, more schools nationwide have begun implementing nutrition and health policies and requiring physical education programs, according to a report released Aug. 26 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

CDC reported that more schools are cracking down on the types of companies that can advertise on school grounds and what types of food are available in vending machines. Since 2006, there has been a 13 percentage point decrease in the number of school districts that allow soft drink companies to advertise on campus, and a 13.6 percentage point increase in the number of districts that prohibit offering junk food in vending machines. Continue reading

Most kids don’t get enough PE, says study

July 10, 2012, CNN

Most schools in the United States are not offering children the suggested amount of physical education, according to a new study.

The study, conducted by Bryan McCullick, a kinesiology professor at the University of Georgia, examined all 50 of the United States and found six states where elementary schools followed recommended physical education guidelines. Two states followed the guidelines at the middle school level, and no states had strong enough regulations at the high school level. Continue reading

New brief summarizes research on physical activity in after-school programs

Nearly one in three young people in the United States are overweight or obese and lack of physical activity contributes to the epidemic.

Leading public health officials recognize after-school programs as an important setting for promoting physical activity and preventing obesity. In recent years, 14 states have adopted policies and national standards have been developed to help increase the amount of physical activity children accumulate while attending after-school programs, but many of this standards and policies lack clearly defined benchmarks. Continue reading