Meet NCCOR researchers at the American Public Health Association’s 142nd Annual Meeting & Exposition

Researchers from the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) will be traveling to New Orleans for the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) 142nd Annual Meeting & Exposition, which takes place Nov. 15-19. More than 12,000 public health professionals from around the world participate in the annual meeting, sharing the latest research and information, promoting best practices, and advocating for public health issues. Continue reading

Expanded Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse a go-to resource for design and public health training, news

The American Public Health Association, American Planning Association, National Network of Public Health Institutes, and Georgia Institute of Technology recently launched a greatly expanded Built Environment and Public Health Clearinghouse (BEPHC) as a resource for community design and public health training and community building. It is intended to be an evolving resource for training at the university and professional levels and a source for relevant news at the critical intersection of health and place.

The newly launched BEPHC website offers both academic and professional training resources that address the link between public health and planning, architecture, health impact assessment, transportation engineering, and other fields. The academic training pages provide information on courses taught at the university level that link public health to the built environment, while the professional training pages resources include multi-sector tools, training, case studies, and best practices to create, promote, and maintain healthy places. Continue reading

Key groups launch research consortium for design, public health collaboration

Request for proposals due Oct. 15 for university-led research 

The AIA Foundation, along with the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), recently announced the establishment of the AIA Design & Health Research Consortium to help fund basic research into the growing influence design has on public health.

The consortium will be comprised of like-minded university teams consisting of experts in architecture and public health. AIA Foundation and its partners will work with consortium members to identify and develop opportunities for funded research, publication, and other resources in design and public health, with the idea that coordination and collaboration will benefit the consortium, its partners, and the design and health professions. Continue reading

Registration now open for the 7th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation

The transformation of health care and public health toward a system that optimizes individual and population health is well under way, with significant expenditures at risk. As policy makers, employers, providers, and patients respond to new demands to show that health care delivery and public health systems can reliably deliver evidence-based and patient-centered services, many are eager to learn what works, for whom, in what contexts, and at what cost.

The 7th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation, co-hosted by AcademyHealth and the National Institutes of Health, aims to engage researchers and experts by bridging the gap between evidence, practice, and policy in health care and public health.

The 2014 agenda includes a dynamic program with panel, oral, and plenary presentations, a keynote address, and two poster sessions, all complemented by peer-reviewed abstracts. The meeting theme, “Transforming Health Systems to Optimize Individual and Population Health” reflects the capacity of evidence-based practices in service delivery to influence health care and population health. Continue reading

Leveraging the power of design and design thinking for public health

Oct. 8, 2013, RWJF Blog

By Matthew Trowbridge

It is increasingly clear that solutions for our most pressing and challenging public health issues will ultimately hinge on designing environments that encourage healthy behavior choices by making them more available, economical, and enjoyable.

Traditional public health approaches are not perfectly suited to this task. For example, epidemiological studies allow us to measure the association between environmental design features such as parks or sidewalks and walking behavior, but these experimental data are generally insufficient to be either actionable by decision-makers or effective in prompting behavior change. As Jeff Speck, urban planner and theorist, observes in his recent book “Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time”:

“The pedestrian is an extremely fragile species, the canary in the coal mine of urban livability. Under the right conditions, this creature thrives and multiplies. But creating   those conditions requires attention to a broad range of criteria, some more easily         satisfied than others.” Continue reading