Electronic health records lag in obesity-related functions

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) studied the use of obesity-related electronic health record (EHR) functions and the characteristics of health care providers and practices who reported using EHRs with weight management functions. The study, “Electronic health records to support obesity-related patient-care: Results from a survey of United States physicians,” was published recently in Preventive Medicine.

Continue reading

Special collection of Preventing Chronic Disease spotlights policies to improve the U.S. population’s diet

How is nutrition policy being implemented across the United States? How can policies work together over time to improve the diet and health of Americans? From New York City to Cleveland-Cuyahoga County, a recent special collection published in Preventing Chronic Disease examines nutrition policies across the United States from a variety of policy levels, types, and settings. Studies in the series, many of which were authored by National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) members and contributors, use diverse methodologies to explore policy development, adoption, implementation, and transferability while tackling best practices in policy translation, communication, and dissemination. Continue reading

Elevating the impact of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation

Public policy can play a major role in impacting childhood obesity, yet little is known about the role of nutrition and obesity policy research in informing public policy decisions.

A supplement published in the April issue of Preventing Chronic Disease includes an essay and three articles examining the role of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation. The supplement was organized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN).

Continue reading

Report: Global obesity costs hit $2 trillion

Nov. 20, 2014, Yahoo! News

By Danica Kirka, Associated Press

The global cost of obesity has risen to $2 trillion annually — nearly as much as smoking or the combined impact of armed violence, war, and terrorism, according to a new report released Nov. 20.

The McKinsey Global Institute consulting firm’s report focused on the economics of obesity, putting it among the top three social programs generated by human beings. It puts its impact at 2.8 percent of global gross domestic product. Continue reading

Kids obese at young age often stay that way

Nov. 10, 2014, HealthDay

By Maureen Salamon

The vast majority of children who are obese at age 11 are still far too heavy at age 16, new research suggests.

Tracking nearly 4,000 children in three U.S. metropolitan areas over five years, researchers found that 83 percent of obese 10th graders had also been obese in fifth grade. Only 12 percent of kids who were obese in fifth grade transitioned to a normal weight over the following half-decade, according to the study. Continue reading

New IOM workshop will discuss how cross-sector solutions can help solve the obesity crisis

Please join the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable (IOM) on Obesity Solutions on Sept. 30, 2014, for a public workshop titled Cross-Sector Work on Obesity Prevention, Treatment, and Weight Maintenance: Models for Change.

Register to attend the workshop at the National Academy of Sciences Building in Washington, DC, or via live webcast at 9 a.m., ET.

The workshop will explore how stakeholders with a traditional role in promoting health, such as health care and public health institutions, have aligned and partnered with sectors not traditionally engaged in health promotion and obesity prevention, including education, transportation, business, and industry. Successful examples of cross-sector collaborations exist, yet barriers exist when scaling and replicating such initiatives. Continue reading

Smoking, extra weight in pregnancy tied to obesity throughout childhood

June 23, 2014, Reuters

By Shereen Lehman

Women who smoke during pregnancy and are overweight early in pregnancy are more likely to have children who become obese as toddlers and stay obese through their teenage years, according to a new study.

Obesity rates have more than doubled among U.S. children and quadrupled among U.S. adolescents in the past three decades, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in every three young people is obese.

The authors of the new study looked at how children’s body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight in relation to height, changed over time, from ages 1 to 18. They found being consistently obese was associated with certain exposures in the womb, and with having asthma and other problems in adolescence.

Past studies looking at risk factors for obesity and the consequences of being obese have focused on weight at one point in time, Dr. Wilfried Karmaus said. Continue reading

Young male smokers may raise obesity risk in their future sons

April 2, 2014, Reuters

By Kate Keland

Men who start smoking before the age of 11 risk having sons who are overweight, British researchers have found, adding to evidence that lifestyle factors even in childhood can affect the health of future offspring.

The scientists said the findings, part of ongoing work in a larger “Children of the ’90s” study, could indicate that exposure to tobacco smoke before the start of puberty in men may lead to metabolic changes in the next generation.

“This discovery of transgenerational effects has big implications for research into the current rise in obesity and the evaluation of preventative measures,” said Marcus Pembrey, a professor of genetics at University College London, who led the study and presented its findings at a briefing on April 2. Continue reading

Gaining excess or too little weight during pregnancy tied to child obesity risk

April 14, 2014, Science World Report

According to researchers at Kaiser Permanente, gaining either excess weight or too little weight during pregnancy appears to elevate the risk of having an obese or overweight child. This study examined recommendations of the Institute of Medicine regarding pregnancy weight gain in relation to childhood obesity.

“Gaining either too little or too much weight in pregnancy may permanently affect mechanisms that manage energy balance and metabolism in the offspring, such as appetite control and energy expenditure,” study’s lead author Sneha Sridhar, MPH, Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, said in a statement. “This could potentially have long-term effects on the child’s subsequent growth and weight.”

For this study, the researchers looked at the health records of over 4,145 racially diverse women who completed the health survey taken from 2007-2009 and had a baby.  Apart from this, the researchers even looked at the medical records of children of ages 2 to 5 years. Continue reading

Overweight teens don’t share in life-expectancy gains

March 28, 2014, HealthDay

By Robert Preidt

Gains in life expectancy don’t extend to adults who were overweight or obese as teens, according to a new study.

The average lifespan in the United States has increased by more than a decade since 1950, to nearly 79 years for someone born in 2011, the researchers said. But rising obesity rates may stall that progress, they said.

“In studying the rate of death among adults younger than age 50, we found that there was no improvement among men who were overweight or obese as teenagers,” said Dr. Amir Tirosh of the division of endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“The mortality rate among overweight and obese teenagers in the years 2000 to 2010 was as high as the rate observed in the 1960s and 1970s,” he said. Continue reading