Chat with NCCOR about childhood obesity on Sept. 9

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Today, nearly one out of three kids in America are overweight or obese. The numbers are even higher in the African American and Hispanic communities. Overweight and obese kids are at risk for a host of chronic obesity-related health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer, and asthma.

In observance of Childhood Obesity Awareness Month in September, join the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research for a Twitter Chat on Sept. 9, at 2 pm, ET.

We’ll be using the hashtag #childobesitychat.

Hosted by NCCOR (@NCCOR) alongside the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (@NICHD_NIH) and National Cancer Institute (@theNCI), we’ll discuss risk factors, research, and promising strategies. Most importantly, we’ll direct you to valuable resources.

In addition, NCCOR members Layla Esposito, Ph.D., and April Oh, Ph.D., M.P.H., of NICHD and NCI, respectively, will serve as our subject matter experts and help guide the discussion.

“It’s a great opportunity to be a part of the social media conversation around childhood obesity,” said Dr. Oh.

“Working with NCCOR to engage with researchers, practitioners, and the broader public about childhood obesity using the interactive Twitter platform is a dynamic way to communicate health and disseminate information,” she added.

Please include #childobesitychat in your tweets and follow @NCCOR for more information. Also, register for our chat at http://twtvite.com/childobesitychat.

Tweet you soon!

NCCOR brings together four of the nation’s leading research funders – the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) – to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and application of childhood obesity research and accelerate progress in reducing childhood obesity.  

NIH presentation about community-academic partnerships to address obesity among middle school students

On Thursday, March 20, Dr. Laura Bogart will be discussing the development and results of Students for Nutrition and eXercise (SNaX), a five-week middle school-based obesity prevention intervention that combines school-wide food environmental changes, multimedia, encouragement to eat healthy school cafeteria foods, and peer-led education.

She will describe the formation and maintenance of the partnership with the participating school district, the Los Angeles Unified School District, as well as relevant community stakeholders; review the results of the randomized controlled trial; and discuss the policy impact of the research and program dissemination activities. Dr. Bogart is associate professor of pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and research director of the Division of General Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital. Continue reading

Materials from NIH Workshop on the Prevention of Obesity in Infancy and Early Childhood

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently held a Workshop on the Prevention of Obesity in Infancy and Early Childhood that brought together scientists with expertise in pediatric obesity, epidemiology, developmental psychology, developmental and behavioral pediatrics, nutrition, physical activity, sleep, temperament, and parenting to determine:

  • What is known regarding risk for excess weight gain in infancy and early childhood
  • What is known regarding interventions that are promising or have been shown to be efficacious
  • Challenges and opportunities in implementing and evaluating behavioral interventions in parents and other caregivers and their young children

Continue reading

NIH webinar: Strengths and weaknesses of experimental and quasi-experimental designs

The National Institutes of Health Office of Disease Prevention (OPD) is hosting a webinar tomorrow for their Medicine: Mind the Gap seminar featuring Dr. William R. Shadish, distinguished professor and founding faculty of the University of California, Merced. Dr. Shadish will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of experimental and quasi-experimental designs.

Recent years have seen important advances in the design and analysis of both randomized experiments and quasi-experiments. In particular, research has focused on empirical tests of the conditions under which nonrandomized experiments can approximate answers from a randomized experiment. Such efforts have a long history in fields such as medicine, psychology, and economics. Recent work is prompted by evidence-based practice and theoretical advances such as Rubin’s causal model. Continue reading

New funding opportunity from NIH/CDC for small business to create tools to collect health metrics

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently released a funding opportunity for small businesses to develop user-friendly tools facilitating the construction of environmental metrics related to the determinants: health behaviors and health care. Such metrics are gaining wider use in the research literature, notably in the development of indices of the food and physical activity environments and in quantifying access to cancer-related health resources.

The grant is funded through the NIH/CDC Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) mechanism. The SBIR program provides support for research and development (R&D) of new or improved technologies and methodologies that have the potential to succeed as commercial products. The program consists of the following three phases: Continue reading

NIH workshop explores ways to prevent obesity in infancy and early childhood

Intervening to prevent the development of overweight and obesity as early as possible has the potential to improve health and reduce the health care costs associated with obesity-related diseases now and in the future. Little is known, however, regarding effective interventions for obesity prevention that might be implemented during infancy and early childhood.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Workshop on the Prevention of Obesity in Infancy and Early Childhood will bring together scientists with expertise in pediatric obesity, epidemiology, developmental psychology, developmental and behavioral pediatrics, nutrition, physical activity, sleep, temperament, and parenting to determine: (1) what is known regarding risk for excess weight gain in infancy and early childhood, (2) what is known regarding interventions that are promising or have been shown to be efficacious, and (3) challenges and opportunities in implementing and evaluating behavioral interventions in parents and other caregivers and their young children. Continue reading

Math model predicts effects of diet, physical activity on childhood weight

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have created and confirmed the accuracy of a mathematical model that predicts how weight and body fat in children respond to adjustments in diet and physical activity. The results will appear online July 30 in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.

While the model may help to set realistic expectations, it has not been tested in a controlled clinical trial to determine if it is an effective tool for weight management.

The model evolved from one developed at NIH in 2011 to predict weight change in adults. The model for children considers their unique physiology, including changes in body composition as they grow. Continue reading

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

Aug. 31, 2012, HHS News Release

September marks the start of National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, a time for us to encourage America’s children to develop healthy habits that can last a lifetime.

All kids deserve to experience the positive health benefits of daily physical activity and healthy eating, and have those opportunities available to them. Continue reading

NIH grant builds on previous RWJF work by funding research to assess the impact of childhood obesity prevention efforts

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded a team at Rutgers to follow a group of children for five years to determine the effectiveness of changes in the physical activity and the food environment on lowering rates of childhood obesity in five of New Jersey’s poorest cities.  The results from these studies will help policy makers identify what strategies are most effective at reversing the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic. Continue reading

IOM publishes presentations from NCCOR members in new report

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently published a report of the presentations and discussions at its Measuring Progress in Obesity Prevention Workshop. The report features presentations from three members of the National Collaborative for Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR): Susan Krebs-Smith (NIH-NCI), Robin McKinnon (NIH-NCI), and Laura Kettel Khan (CDC-DNPAO). Continue reading