Family TV saturated with junk food ads

March 24, 2014, Medical Xpress

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have found that young people are exposed to advertisements that promote unhealthy food during primetime TV, which are normally banned from children’s programming.

An analysis of more than 750 ads found that almost one in four TV ads shown between 8-9 p.m. were for food, and it was possible for viewers to be exposed to as many as 11 ads for junk food per hour.

Within these food ads, the most frequently shown ads promoted unhealthy products from supermarkets such as Aldi and Morrisons (25 percent), followed by fast-food chains such as KFC (13 percent), with chocolate and sweet companies like Lindt and Haribo the third most common (12 percent). Continue reading

Junk food laws may help curb childhood obesity: Study

Aug. 13, 2012, Huffington Post

By Lindsey Tanner

Laws strictly curbing school sales of junk food and sweetened drinks may play a role in slowing childhood obesity, according to a study that seems to offer the first evidence such efforts could pay off.

The results come from the first large national look at the effectiveness of the state laws over time. They are not a slam-dunk, and even obesity experts who praised the study acknowledge the measures are a political hot potato, smacking of a “nanny state” and opposed by industry and cash-strapped schools relying on food processors’ money. Continue reading

Research says junk food advertising reductions have been modest

The Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity has released a new report titled Trends in Television Food Advertising to Young People: 2011 Update.

It follows up on its 2010 update of the same name. Like other recent studies, this Rudd Center report shows some progress in reducing junk food advertising to kids younger than 12.

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