Electronic health records lag in obesity-related functions

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) studied the use of obesity-related electronic health record (EHR) functions and the characteristics of health care providers and practices who reported using EHRs with weight management functions. The study, “Electronic health records to support obesity-related patient-care: Results from a survey of United States physicians,” was published recently in Preventive Medicine.

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Special collection of Preventing Chronic Disease spotlights policies to improve the U.S. population’s diet

How is nutrition policy being implemented across the United States? How can policies work together over time to improve the diet and health of Americans? From New York City to Cleveland-Cuyahoga County, a recent special collection published in Preventing Chronic Disease examines nutrition policies across the United States from a variety of policy levels, types, and settings. Studies in the series, many of which were authored by National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR) members and contributors, use diverse methodologies to explore policy development, adoption, implementation, and transferability while tackling best practices in policy translation, communication, and dissemination. Continue reading

Elevating the impact of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation

Public policy can play a major role in impacting childhood obesity, yet little is known about the role of nutrition and obesity policy research in informing public policy decisions.

A supplement published in the April issue of Preventing Chronic Disease includes an essay and three articles examining the role of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation. The supplement was organized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN).

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Help CDC spread the word about obesity during September’s National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

Approximately 1 of every 5 (17%) children in the United States has obesity, and certain groups of children are more affected than others. Childhood obesity puts children at early risk for type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease—conditions usually associated with adulthood.

There is no single or simple solution to childhood obesity.  It is influenced by many different factors, including a lack of access to healthy, affordable food and drinks as well as limited opportunities for physical activity in the places where children live, learn, and play.  Working together, states, communities, and parents can help make the healthy choice the easy choice for children and adolescents. Continue reading

Chat with NCCOR about childhood obesity on Sept. 9


Today, nearly one out of three kids in America are overweight or obese. The numbers are even higher in the African American and Hispanic communities. Overweight and obese kids are at risk for a host of chronic obesity-related health problems like heart disease, high blood pressure, cancer, and asthma.

In observance of Childhood Obesity Awareness Month in September, join the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research for a Twitter Chat on Sept. 9, at 2 pm, ET.

We’ll be using the hashtag #childobesitychat.

Hosted by NCCOR (@NCCOR) alongside the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (@NICHD_NIH) and National Cancer Institute (@theNCI), we’ll discuss risk factors, research, and promising strategies. Most importantly, we’ll direct you to valuable resources.

In addition, NCCOR members Layla Esposito, Ph.D., and April Oh, Ph.D., M.P.H., of NICHD and NCI, respectively, will serve as our subject matter experts and help guide the discussion.

“It’s a great opportunity to be a part of the social media conversation around childhood obesity,” said Dr. Oh.

“Working with NCCOR to engage with researchers, practitioners, and the broader public about childhood obesity using the interactive Twitter platform is a dynamic way to communicate health and disseminate information,” she added.

Please include #childobesitychat in your tweets and follow @NCCOR for more information. Also, register for our chat at http://twtvite.com/childobesitychat.

Tweet you soon!

NCCOR brings together four of the nation’s leading research funders – the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) – to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and application of childhood obesity research and accelerate progress in reducing childhood obesity.  

New resources from Bridging the Gap and CDC highlight local school wellness policies

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Bridging the Gap program, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recently released a new set of resources highlighting opportunities to support wellness policies through evidence-based strategies. These briefs provide an assessment of policies across school districts nationwide, related to seven wellness policy components. They also highlight areas of opportunity for state agencies, school districts, and schools to strengthen wellness policy components. See all seven topic area briefs plus a methods document below. Continue reading

Obesity rate for young children plummets 43 percent in a decade

Feb. 25, 2014, The New York Times

By Sabrina Tavernise

Federal health authorities on Feb. 25 reported a 43 percent drop in the obesity rate among 2- to 5-year-old children over the past decade, the first broad decline in an epidemic that often leads to lifelong struggles with weight and higher risks for cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

The drop emerged from a major federal health survey that experts say is the gold standard for evidence on what Americans weigh. The trend came as a welcome surprise to researchers. New evidence has shown that obesity takes hold young: Children who are overweight or obese at ages 3 to 5 years are five times as likely to be overweight or obese as adults. Continue reading

IOM to host public workshop on obesity solutions

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Obesity Solutions is inviting the public to attend its first workshop, “The Current State of Obesity Solutions in the United States.”

Tues., Jan. 7, 2014
12:30-5:30 p.m.
The National Academies Building
2101 Constitution Ave., NW
Washington, DC

The workshop will present a status update on the current epidemiology of obesity and explore the prevalence, trends, severity, and disparities across the United States. Workshop presenters will discuss key settings where change is happening, focusing on nutrition, physical activity, the elimination of health disparities, and next steps. Continue reading

Most people use calorie information at fast food restaurants, when they read it

Nov. 22, 2013, Journal of Public Health

According to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) adults who read calorie information when it is available at fast food and chain restaurants tend to use the information when purchasing food. The authors, including Heidi Blanck, chief of CDC’s Obesity Prevention and Control Branch and member of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research, found that 95.4 percent of those who read calorie information used it at least sometimes when making their food choices. The study was published online this week in the Journal of Public Health. Continue reading

NCCOR Envision member discusses the effectiveness of childhood obesity interventions

As part of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity Seminar Series, Steven Gortmaker, a professor for the Harvard School of Public Health and member of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research Envision project, is presenting findings from a series of papers examining the cost-effectiveness of four childhood obesity interventions.

The discussion will focus on The Childhood Obesity Intervention Cost-Effectiveness Study (CHOICES) Project. This project is a collaboration between the Harvard School of Public Health, Columbia University, and research partners at Deakin and Queensland University in Australia. Over several years the CHOICES Research Team is assessing the cost-effectiveness of approximately 40 interventions aimed at reducing childhood obesity, including policy changes, programs, and interventions that have been identified as being effective, promising, or prevalent. Continue reading