Study examined association between household behaviors, youth BMI

This study sought to determine whether children (aged 9–18 years) who live in households that have healthful practices related to behaviors associated with obesity have a lower body mass index (BMI).

Researchers analyzed data from the 2005 Styles mail panel survey and found that children watched more television if they had a television in their bedrooms, were less active as a family, and had no junk food restrictions at home. Children in less active families participated in about half as much vigorous physical activity as children in more active families. Children purchased more sodas and snacks at school if they had a television in their bedrooms and their family consumed more meals at fast-food restaurants. Children whose families were less active were more likely to have a self-reported BMI at or above the 85th percentile. In addition, children who watched more television were more likely to have a self-reported BMI at or above the 85th percentile.

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