Obesity rates decline among low-income preschoolers after rising for decades

Aug. 6, 2013, The Washington Post

By Lena H. Sun

After decades of rising, obesity rates among low-income U.S. preschoolers declined broadly from 2008-2011, according to a federal report released Aug. 6 that offered the first glimpse of good news for children considered among the most vulnerable to the disease’s health risks.

While other, smaller studies have cited drops among school-age children, the data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) represent by far the largest and most comprehensive report of declining obesity rates in poor children, officials said. Continue reading

CDC telebriefing discusses declining obesity rates among low-income preschoolers

What:
After decades of rising rates, there are signs of progress in the fight against childhood obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will discuss state-by-state obesity rates among low-income preschoolers, where progress is being made, and what can be done to continue this progress.

Who:
Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., Director, CDC

When:
Tuesday, Aug. 6 at Noon ET

Dial-In:
888-795-0855

Important Instructions: 
If you would like to ask a question during the call, press *1 on your touchtone phone. Press *2 to withdraw your question. You may queue up at any time. You will hear a tone to indicate your question is pending.

Transcript:
A transcript of this media availability will be available following the briefing at CDC’s web site www.cdc.gov/media.

 

Philadelphia School District reports progress in reducing childhood obesity rates

Sept. 6, 2012, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

The overall obesity rate among Philadelphia schoolchildren fell more than 4.5 percent between the 2006-07 and 2009-10 school years, according to a study published today in Preventing Chronic Disease. The decrease, from an obesity rate of 21.5 percent to 20.5 percent, was reported among male and female students ages 5 to 18 from all racial and ethnic groups. The largest declines were seen among African American boys and Hispanic girls. Continue reading