Preemie birth linked to higher insulin levels in kids

Feb. 11, 2013, HealthDay

By Randy Dotinga

Based on tests of newborns and young children, a new study suggests that premature babies could face a higher risk of diabetes much later in life.

The findings don’t confirm a connection between premature birth and diabetes, although other studies have hinted at a possible connection and increased risk.

But they do show that babies and young children have higher insulin levels if they were born before full term, and the levels are greatest in those who were the most premature. Higher insulin levels, in turn, could be an indicator of diabetes even decades down the line, the researchers noted. Continue reading

Diabetes risk tied to weight gain in youth

Oct. 29, 2013, MedPage Today

By Michael Smith

The risk of developing diabetes in adulthood is associated with weight in adolescence and weight gain during the teens and early 20s, researchers reported.

In a longitudinal cohort of teens and young adults, the timing of the weight gain also appeared to play a role in diabetes risk, according to Penny Gordon-Larsen, Ph.D., a professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

On the other hand, hypertension in adulthood was associated just with adult body mass index (BMI), while inflammation was linked only to increasing BMI, Gordon-Larsen and colleagues reported in the November issue of Obesity. Continue reading

Vitamin D may lower diabetes risk in obese children and adolescents, study finds

March 26, 2013, Medical Xpress

Childhood and adolescent obesity rates in the United States have increased dramatically in the past three decades. Being obese puts individuals at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes, a disease in which individuals have too much sugar in their blood. Now, University of Missouri researchers found vitamin D supplements can help obese children and teens control their blood-sugar levels, which may help them stave off the disease.

“By increasing vitamin D intake alone, we got a response that was nearly as powerful as what we have seen using a prescription drug,” said Catherine Peterson, an associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology at MU. “We saw a decrease in insulin levels, which means better glucose control, despite no changes in body weight, dietary intake or physical activity.” Continue reading

Obese states: The highest and lowest rates of obesity, by state

March, 6, 2013, Huffington Post

The obesity rate in the United States is, on a whole, staying steady, according to a new Gallup-Healthways report.

The report shows that the obesity rate was 26.2 percent in 2012, which is about the same as the 26.1 percent rate in 2011.

State obesity rates have also largely remained unchanged, with only three states experiencing an increase in obesity — New Jersey, North Carolina, and Georgia — and one state actually experiencing a decrease in obesity — Delaware. Continue reading

CDC projects huge diabetes jump in kids, teens

Nov. 21, 2012, The Atlanta Journal Constitution

By Salynn Boyles, Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

The number of children and teens with type 1 and type 2 diabetes is expected to spike dramatically in the next 40 years, creating what one expert calls a potential catastrophe for the nation’s health care system.

Rates of type 2 diabetes could increase four times over the next 40 years, and rates of type 1 diabetes may triple, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC’s numbers assume that the rate of diabetes will increase over time. Continue reading